Z. Smith Reynolds Library (Wake Forest University ) All Items

1.George L. Bright Civil War diary | Bright, George L. | 1862 | XML
2.Lipe Family Civil War letters | Lipe Family | 1861-1865 | XML
3.Letter from Thomas L. Purdie to Eliza Ann Lipe, May 20, 1864 | Purdie, Thomas | 1864 May 20 | XML
4.Letter from Thomas L. Purdie to Eliza Ann Lipe, April 6, 1865 | Purdie, Thomas | 1865 Apr. 6 | XML
5.Letter from James C. Moore to Eliza Ann Lipe, September 18, 1862 | Moore, James | 1862 Sept. 18 | XML
6.Letter from James C. Moore to Eliza Ann Lipe, November 26, 1862 | Moore, James | 1862 Nov. 26 | XML
7.Letter from James C. Moore to Eliza Ann Lipe, November 14, 1864 | Moore, James | 1864 Nov. 14 | XML
8.Letter from George L.D. Lipe to Eliza Ann Lipe, August 22, 1861 | Lipe, George | 1861 Aug. 22 | XML
9.Letter from George L. Kistler to Eliza Ann Lipe, October 15, 1864 | Kistler, George | 1864 Oct. 15 | XML
10.Letter from George L. Kistler to Eliza Ann Lipe, November 20, 1864 | Kistler, George | 1864 Nov. 20 | XML
11.Letter from George L. Kistler to Eliza Ann Lipe, January 4, 1865 | Kistler, George | 1865 Jan. 4 | XML
12.Letter from George L. Kistler to Eliza Ann Lipe, February 22, 1865 | Kistler, George | 1865 Feb. 22 | XML
13.Letter from Robert M. Emerson to Jennie Lipe, February 23, 1865 | Emerson, Robert | 1865 Feb. 23 | XML
14.Letter from J.L. Lipe to Margaret, undated | Lipe, J.L. | XML
15.Letter from unknown author to Eliza Ann Lipe, undated | Lipe, [unknown] | XML
16.Unidentified note to A.A. Lipe, MD, undated | Lipe, [unknown] | XML
17."Song Ballad," unidentified Civil War lyrical poem | Lipe, [unknown] | XML
18.Letter from unknown author to Eliza Ann Lipe, June 1, 1865 | Lipe, [unknown] | 1865 June 1 | XML
19.Letter from unknown author to Eliza Ann Lipe, February 17, 1865 | Lipe, [unknown] | 1865 Feb. 17 | XML
20.Letter from H.J. McKay to Eliza Ann Lipe, November 6, 1864 | McKay, H.J. | 1864 Nov. 6 | XML
21.Note from Milas W. Lipe, undated | Lipe, Milas W. | XML
22.Letter from Elburtus Kennerly to Eliza Ann Lipe, August 21, 1863 | Kennerly, Elburtus | 1863 Aug. 21 | XML
23.Unidentified letter fragment, undated | Lipe, [unknown] | XML
24.Letter from James C. Moore to Eliza Ann Lipe, March 17, 1865 | Moore, James | 1865 Mar. 17 | XML
25.Letter from Catharine Moore to Eliza Ann Lipe, undated | Moore, Catharine | XML
26."The Dixie Boys," poem by Milas W. Lipe, June 7, 1865 | Lipe, Milas W. | 1865 June 7 | XML
27.Confederate broadsides | 1861-1865 | XML
28.Gen. Scott a-sleep. First line: O! they're all dreaming, dream, dream, dreaming | 1862 | XML
29.Jeff. Davis forever. First line: Yankees may sing of their rank pork and beans | 1861 | XML
30.Maryland in fetters! First line: How beautiful in tears! | 1861 | XML
31.Picayune Butler. First line: Old fuss and feathers, as we knew before | 1861 | XML
32.Gen. Jeff. Davis.At head of title: Song of the south! | 1861 | XML
33.Maryland Zouaves own / respectfully deidcated to the First Regiment Maryland Zouaves, by their friend, G.W. Alexander. First line: We are bound all hands for the land of Cotton | Alexander, Geo. W. (George William), 1802-1890 | 1861 | XML
34.Fourth of July song : gotten up expressly for those who have an appreciative mind. First line: Enthroned in obliquy, Abe Lincoln sits | 1861 | XML
35.Hail! to the south | Hail to the south | 1861 | XML
36.Letter to the democracy | A letter to the democracy | 1861 | XML
37.Dying soldier. First line: My noble commander, thank God you have come The dying soldier. | 1861 | XML
38.The Southern matron to her son. First line: I weep, as I leave you, with bitter emotion | 1861 | XML
39.Our southern flag / by a Baltimore rebel. First line: There's a gallant banner floating o'er the home of liberty | 1862 | XML
40.Rally round the standard boys. First line: My heart is in the South boys, my heart is not here | 1862 | XML
41.Our own southern banner. First line: At the call of Columbia I sprang into the ranks | 1861 | XML
42.Maryland : a fragment. First line: Refreshed in wonted might | 1861 | XML
43.Jackson's requiem / B. First line: That noted burglar Ellsworth | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
44.Oh Jeff! Why don't you come? First line: Jeff Davis are you coming?We'll be glad to see you here! | 1861 | XML
45.Gov. Hicks. First line: Mister Hicks, full of tricks | 1861 | XML
46.Rally around the stars and bars! / by Robert Lamb. First line: Rally round your country's flag ye freemen of the South | Lamb, Robert. | 1861 | XML
47.Patriotic prayer for the southern cause. | 1861 | XML
48.Maryland, dear Maryland / N.G.R. First line: Old Line's foot is on thy shore | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
49.South Carolina : a patriotic ode. First line: Land of the Palmetto tree | 1861 | XML
50.The very latest from Butler. First line: Some general love the battle's roar | 1861 | XML
51.God and liberty! First line: In the name of God! Amen! | Blunt, Ellen Key, 1821-1884. | 1861 | XML
52.Bonnie blue flag. First line: We are a band of brothers, and native to the soil The bonnie blue flag. | Macarthy, Harry, 1834-1888. | 1861 | XML
53.Them saucy masked batteries. First line: Yankee soldiers went down South | 1861 | XML
54.The South. First line: South I wonder every heart | 1861 | XML
55.If you belong to Dixie's land. First line: To bring you this good news I've come | 1861 | XML
56.The serenade of the 300,000 federal ghosts : respectfully dedicated to old black Abe. First line: From the battle-field afar, where the wounded and the dying | 1861 | XML
57.The Southern cross. First line: Oh! say can you see, through the gloom and the storm | Tucker, Henry St. George, 1853-1932. | 1862 | XML
58.Ladies of Richmond. First line: Fold away all your bright tinted dresses | 1861 | XML
59.Southron war song. First line: Southrons, lo! the tyrants' hand | 1861 | XML
60.Bonnie blue flag!First line: We are a band of brothers, and natives of the soil The bonnie blue flag! | Macarthy, Harry, 1834-1888. | 1863 | XML
61.Liberty or death. First line: On! On! to the just and glorious strife | 1861 | XML
62.The Lone star camp song : as sung by Joe Cook, the American comedian. First line: Our rifles are ready, and ready are we | Cook, Joe. | 1861 | XML
63.Our Southern dead / A. First line: Mourn for our glorious dead | 1861 | XML
64.Alabama cottage : a homely scene. First line: Alabamian sat by the chimney side The Alabama cottage : a homely scene. | 1861 | XML
65.Fiat justitia / H. Rebel. First line: There is no day, however darkly clouded | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1862 | XML
66.The southern cross. First line: In the name of God! Amen! | Blunt, Ellen Lloyd Key, 1821-1884. | 1861 | XML
67.The tyrant's cap. First line: Galling chain has fettered now | 1862 | XML
68.Exodus. First line: Ho! birght eyed maidens of the South, your happy voices raise The Exodus. | 1861 | XML
69.Barnstable's apology [manuscript] / B. First line: Victim of circumstance | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
70.Marshall Kane. First line: Come and listen to my story | 1861 | XML
71.The Rebel's retort. First line: Tell us not we will make blunders | 1861 | XML
72.The retreat of the Grand Army from Bull Run by Ernest Cliftan. First line: Way down in Virginia | Cliftan, Ernest. | 1861 | XML
73.Southern song of liberty. First line: On! on! to the just and glorious strife | 1861 | XML
74.The Southern wagon. First line: Come all ye sons of Freedom and join our Southern band | 1861 | XML
75.The Georgia volunteer. First line: I leave my home and thee, dear | 1861 | XML
76.Dedicated to the Baltimore Light Artillery, CSA / by Captain Alexander. First line: Maryland boys are coming | Alexander, George W., Captain. | 1863 | XML
77.Lines on the death of the Confederate Gen. Albert Sidney Johnston, of Ky. : who fell at the battle of "Shiloh," Miss., Sunday, April 6, 1862. First line: Thou art gone to thy rest | 1862 | XML
78.The national prayer. First line: From Lincoln and Hicks. | Whittingham, William Rollinson, 1805-1879. | 1861 | XML
79.Mother's prayer. First line: Father! in the battle fray A mother's prayer | 1862 | XML
80.Lines on the proclamation issued by the tyrant Lincoln, April first, 1863 / by a Rebel. First line: We have read the tyrant's order | Brewer, James R. | 1861 | XML
81.There is life in old Maryland yet / Cola. First line: Again a smothered voice speaks out | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
82.Southern sentiments / B. First line: Northern hordes invasion threat | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
83.The old line's appeal / N.G.R. First line: Old Line's foot is on thy shore | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
84.Broker's "Stamp Act" lament. First line: Each one we meet upon the street The Broker's "Stamp Act" lament. | 1861 | XML
85.Great cry and litlle [sic.] wool, or, : the leading black republicans described in verse / by Barnstable.Great cry and little wool | Barnstable, Dr. | 1861 | XML
86.Maryland, my home. First line: Sweet Maryland, thy groves are green | Bonsal, Louis | 1861 | XML
87.Hurrah for Jeff. Davis / by a Lady Rebel ; written after the battle of Bull Run. | 1861 | XML
88.There is life in old Maryland yet / Cola. First line: Again a smothered voice speaks out | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
89.Dear liberty, or, Maryland will be free / by Miss R.L., a daughter of Dixie. First line: Farewell, dear Liberty, farewell for awhile | 1862 | XML
90.Gay and happy. First line: Southern boys are gay and happy | 1861 | XML
91.Awake in Dixie : air -- "Dixie's Land" / H.T.S. First line: Hear ye not the sound of battle | Stanton, Henry T. (Henry Thompson), 1834-1898. | 1862 | XML
92.True-hearted, brave and patriotic southern girls of the Monumental city. / written by a Confederate prisoner whilst in Baltimore. First line: Daughter's of the sunny south | 1861 | XML
93.Uncle Snow. First line: Oh, my name is Uncle Snow, and I'll have you all to know | 1861 | XML
94.Federal vendue: Abraham auctionarius loquitur. First line: "And going--going! Step up, friends The federal vendue: Abraham auctionarius loquitur. | 1861 | XML
95.John Brown's entrance into hell. First line: Come gentle muse and touch a strain | 1861 | XML
96.Jeff Davis in the White House / by a Lady, daughter of one of the old defenders. First line: Ye northern men in Washington | 1861 | XML
97.The Southern wagon. First line: Come all ye sons of Freedom and join our Southern band | 1861 | XML
98.Maryland Southern volunteer's song. First line: We're the boys so gay and happy | Howard, Francis Key, 1826-1872. | 1861 | XML
99.Song of the "Maryland line" at Richmond / by Big Sergeant. First line: We've left our homes in Maryland | 1861 | XML
100.The Spirit of 1861. First line: Arise confederates! hear your country's call! | 1861 | XML
101.Sunny South. First line: To arms, to arms, and old Abe shall see | 1861 | XML
102.Burn the cotton! | Brown, Martha Frazer. | 1862 | XML
103.To the Maryland sons of revolutionary sires. First line: Ye sons of Sires, of manly deeds, who died for love of right | 1861 | XML
104.These lines are respectfully dedicated to William P. Morgan of Virginia : president of the graduating class of the University of Maryland by his fellow students. First line: To arms! to arms! defend the soil | 1861 | XML
105.William Price. First line: Your sharp Treason Bill, Wm. Price, Wm. Price | Hodges, James, b. 1843. | 1861 | XML
106.It is I! First line: They come, they come--a motley crew | 1861 | XML
107.Our hope / Le Diable Baiteux. First line: God save our Southern land | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
108.Old Lincoln and his fellows, is the abolitionist's government. First line: "What a precious set!" | 1861 | XML
109.Right must prevail / H. Rebel. First line: There is no day, however darkly clouded | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1861 | XML
110.Somebody hurt! First line: Hark! the cries of widowed mothers | 1861 | XML
111.Down-trodden Maryland / N.G.R. First line: Down-trodden, despised see brave Maryland lie | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1862 | XML
112.Epitaph. First line: Mr. Cox, Member of Congress from Ohio, concluded his speech of June 6, 1862 with the following | Cox, Samuel Sullivan, 1824-1889. | 1861 | XML
113.Quamdiu tandem abutere patientiae nostra? Ad quem finem sese jactabit Audacia? / B. First line: Come gentle Muse, give me your aid | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
114.Great Big Bethel fight : awful calamity. First line: I'll tell you of a tale that lately befel | 1861 | XML
115.The Marylander's good bye. First line: Adieu! Adieu! dear Maryland | 1861 | XML
116.There's "no body" hurt!! There's nobody hurt!! | 1861 | XML
117.Yankee vandals. First line: Northern abolition vandals | 1861 | XML
118.General Lee. First line: There is a man in Old Virginny | 1862 | XML
119.Battle of Manassas / by Susan Archer Talley. First line: Now proudly lift, oh, sunny South The battle of Manassas / by Susan Archer Talley. | Talley, Susan Archer. | 1861 | XML
120.Devil's visit to "Old Abe" / by Rev. E.P. Birch. First line: Old Abe was sitting in his chair of state The devil's visit to "Old Abe" / by Rev. E.P. Birch. | Birch, E. P. (Edmund Pendleton), 1824-1883. | 1861 | XML
121.Maryland in chains / J. First line: Are we free? Go ask the question | Brewer, James R. | 1861 | XML
122.Answer to the poem entitled "How they act in Baltimore / Redgauntlet. First line: When our ladies on the street | Morris, Thomas Hollingsworth, 1817-1872. | 1861 | XML
123.To Sauerwein / by a member of the Baltimore Corn Exchange. First line: Union men have left the floor | 1861 | XML
124.Maryland! my Maryland! First line: Despot's heel is on thy shore | Randall, James Ryder, 1839-1908. | 1861 | XML
125.Maryland's appeal. First line: Oh, Maryland, enslaved, opprest | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1862 | XML
126.Song of the privateer / by Quien Sabe? First line: Away o'er the boundless sea | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
127.Toast to Virginia. A toast to Virginia | 1861 | XML
128.The stars and bars. First line: Oh! say do you see now so vauntingly bourne | 1861 | XML
129.Bold engineer / O.H.S. First line: O bully George B. has come out of the west The bold engineer / O.H.S. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
130.All spice, or, Spice for all / Le Diable Boiteaux. First line: People endure all | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
131.Niggers in convention : Sumner's speech. First line: Welcome my bredren here you is | 1861 | XML
132.There's life in the old land yet / J.B. First line: There's life in the land that gave Carroll his birth | Brady, John. | 1861 | XML
133.Recognition of the Southern Confederacy. First line: Recognize us, recognize us | 1861 | XML
134.Call! / A.B. First line: Maryland! Maryland! The call! / A.B. | 1862 | XML
135.Appeal for Maryland, / B. First line: Of all the gems that gild the wreath An appeal for Maryland, / B. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
136.Our rights. First line: Stars and stripes, oh lovely cloth | 1861 | XML
137.Southern prisoner : gives his thanks to the Baltimore ladies. First line: I left Winchester Court-house, all in the month of May | 1863 | XML
138.Maryland! my Maryland! : (new version) First line: To arms! to arms! defend the soil | 1861 Nov. 14 | XML
139.Southern Yankee Doodle. First line: Gallant Major Anderson! | 1862 | XML
140.We'll be free in Maryland / composed by Robert E. Holtz, Jan. 30, 1862. First line: Boys down South in Dixie's land | Holtz, Robert E. | 1861 | XML
141.To the Baltimore poet, Thomas H. M-rr-s : author of "How they act in Baltimore" / Mephistophiles K.G.S. First line: So Tom has turned a poet, what a dear | Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1795-1870. | 1862 | XML
142.Exiled soldier's adieu to Maryland / X. First line: Adieu my home ! Adieu dear Maryland! The Exiled soldier's adieu to Maryland / X. | 1861 | XML
143.Gen. Johnston. First line: Behold the brave son of the good "Old Dominion" | 1862 | XML
144.Dixie's land : no. 2. First line: I wish I was in de land of cotton | Emmett, Daniel Decatur, 1815-1904. | 1861 | XML
145.General Butler. First line: Butler and I went out from camp | 1861 | XML
146.All spice, or Spice for all / Cola. First line: People endure all | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1863 | XML
147.The Marylander's good bye / B. First line: Adieu! Adieu! dear Maryland | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
148.Confederate form of prayer. First line: Almighty God, the sovereign disposer of events The Confederate form of prayer. | 1861 | XML
149.Hurrah for Dixie!First line: Southrons, hear your Country call you! | Pike, Albert, 1809-1891. | 1861 | XML
150.God will repay / H. Rebel. First line: There is no day, however darkly clouded | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1861 | XML
151.Beauregard at Manassas. First line: Now glory to the Lord of hosts, oh, bless and praise his name | Clarke, Mary Devereux. | 1862 | XML
152.John C. Fremont : my jo / as sung by the soldiers of General McClellan's army. First line: John Charles Fremont, my jo John, when nature formed the plan | 1861 | XML
153.Reply to the Virginian girl's Address to her Maryland lover. First line: Farewell to submission | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
154.There is life in the old land yet. First line: Though the soil of old Maryland echoes the tread | Howard, Francis Key, 1826-1872. | 1861 | XML
155.Battle song of the "black horsemen / C. First line: We have come from the brave Southwest | 1862 | XML
156.Lays of the corn exchange : no. 1. First line: Secession triumphant! then each rebel imp | 1861 | XML
157.Song. First line: You Rebels come along and listen to my song | Borrowich, Joseph. | 1861 | XML
158.On to victory : Gen. McClelan's war song!Gen. McClelan's war song! | 1862 | XML
159.The soldier's song / by A. Stuart, Co. I, 9th Ind. Regiment. First line: Who would not be a soldier brave? | 1862 | XML
160.O, lovely Dixie's land / M.V. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
161.The song of the exile / B. First line: Oh, here I am in the land of cotton | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
162.There's life in the old land yet! / By Jas. R. Randall. First line: By blue Patapsco's billowy dash. | Randall, James Ryder, 1839-1908. | 1861 | XML
163.Two years ago / by a drafted wide awake. First line: I was a glorious wide-awake | 1861 | XML
164.Is there nobody hurt. First line: Hark! the cries of widowed mothers | 1861 | XML
165.Graves for the invaders : a fragment. | 1861 | XML
166.Bull's Run. First line: Says Greely to Scott, to Richmond, why not | 1861 | XML
167.Congressman Ely. First line: As I rode down to Manassas one day | 1861 | XML
168.Baltimore girls. First line: Oh the girls of dear old Baltimore The Baltimore girls. | 1861 | XML
169.Flag. First line: Stars and stripes! is that the flag the northern army waves The flag. | 1861 | XML
170.Southern battle song / C. First line: Come gallant sons of noble sires | Cahill, James. | 1861 | XML
171.The Southern war song. First line: We shall win! we shall win! for our cause it is just | 1861 | XML
172.Kentuckians, to arms!!!First line: Kentuckians, rise! | 1861 | XML
173.Country, home and liberty. First line: Freedom calls you! Quick, be ready | 1861 | XML
174.Appeal to the South / by "a daughter of Dixie". First line: Hark! o'er the southern hills I hear An appeal to the South / by a "daughter of Dixie" | 1861 | XML
175.Battle of the stoves-pipes [sic]. First line: On Munson's heights the Rebel banners wave The Battle of the stoves-pipes [sic]. | Lemmon, Nannie. | 1861 | XML
176.Address to her Maryland lover / by a Virginia girl ; and his reply. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. Reply to the Virginian girl's address to her Maryland lover. | 1861 | XML
177.Dix's manifesto / B. First line: Once on a time in Baltimore | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
178.Voice from the old Maryland line / N.G.R. First line of poem: Old Line's foot is on thy shore A voice from the old Maryland line / N.G.R. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry) | 1861 | XML
179.Battle song of the Maryland line. First line: To arms! to arms! the fight's begun The battle song of the Maryland line. | 1861 | XML
180.Confederate States. First line: Yankees may sing of their rank pork and beans The Confederate States. | 1861 | XML
181.Remember and repay! / H. First line: Remember, - men of Maryland | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1861 | XML
182.A.D. 1862, or, The volunteer zouave in Baltimore / by an officer of the "Guards."Volunteer zouave in Baltimore | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | Harwood, Fannie A. | 1861 | XML
183.Maryland. First line: Despot's heel is on thy shore | Randall, James Ryder, 1839-1908. | 1862 | XML
184.States' rights song. First line: Ye States' Rights men, come one and all | 1861 | XML
185.Louisiana : a patriotic ode. First line: Louisiana! dear pelican mother arise | 1862 | XML
186.The south and north. First line: Southrons and the Northers, O! | 1861 | XML
187.Our opinion. First line: "Oh! mammy have you heard the news?" | 1861 | XML
188.Battle of Big Bethel. First line: Though Butler be a hero The battle of Big Bethel. | 1861 | XML
189.Prayer for Maryland. First line: From Lincoln and Hick's | Whittingham, William Rollinson, 1805-1879. | 1862 | XML
190.Oh! Abraham resign! / by a new contributor. First line: Days are growing shorter | 1861 | XML
191.The Southern wagon. First line: Come all ye sons of Freedom and join our Southern band | 1861 | XML
192.Boston British in Baltimore. First line: Hallo! What's the matter? The Boston British in Baltimore. | 1861 | XML
193.Ben M'Cullough. First line: Oh have you heard of the brave old fellow | Brady, John. | 1861 | XML
194.The Virginia's knocking around / M. First line: Twas on a windy night in March | M., fl. 1862. | 1861 | XML
195.Appeal for peace : sent to Lieut. Gen. Scott, July 4, 1861 / Women of Maryland.An appeal for peace : sent to Lieut. Gen. Scott, July 4, 1861 / Women of Maryland | 1861 | XML
196.Maryland / by James R. Randall. First line: Despot's heel is on thy shore | Randall, James Ryder, 1839-1908. | 1861 | XML
197.The national prayer : for "humiliation day". First line: From Lincoln and Hicks. | Whittingham, William Rollinson, 1805-1879. | 1861 | XML
198.The Marylander at Manassas : a fact / N.G.R. First line: Dusty and weary I laid me down | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882 | 1861 | XML
199.Advance to Richmond : by way of the junction. First line: Oh be easy, don't you teaze me | 1861 | XML
200.Dying Confederate's last words / Maryland. First line: Dear comrades on my brow the hand of death is cast The dying Confederate's last words / Maryland. | Katzenberger, L. | 1863 | XML
201.Song. First line: You Rebels come along and listen to my song | Borrowich, Joseph. | 1861 | XML
202.The march of the Maryland men. First line: There's many a son of old Maryland's soil | 1861 | XML
203.John Bell of Tennessee. First line: There is a man of noble heart | 1861 | XML
204.Fort Sumpter : a Southern song / by Dr. Barnstable, B.C.H.G. First line: Come now and gather round me | Barnstable, Dr. | 1862 | XML
205.Bull Run. First line: Says Greely to Scott, to Richmond, why not | 1862 | XML
206.Chivalrous C.S.A.! / B. First line: I'll sing you a song of the south's sunny clime | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
207.Song of the Baltimore rebels. First line: Let us join the army, let us join the army | 1861 | XML
208.Acrostic. First line: Brutal by nature, a coward and knave | 1861 | XML
209.Camp song of the Maryland line : as sung by the Baltimore Boys in Richmond. First line: We're the boys, so gay and happy | Howard, Francis Key, 1826-1872. | 1861 | XML
210.Rebel gunpowder. First line: John Harrolson! John Harrolson! | 1861 | XML
211.Debt of Maryland / H. First line: Remember-men of Maryland The debt of Maryland / H. | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1861 | XML
212.Our debt. First line: Remember, - men of Maryland | Sumner, Helen, 1834-1887. | 1862 | XML
213.Maryland's lament for Jackson / by Baltimora. First line: Gone from us--gone from us! | 1861 | XML
214.Peace / written by a fool. First line: Peace on earth, good will to men | 1861 | XML
215.Baltimore. First line: Hail queen of cities, birth place of the just | 1861 | XML
216.Munson's Hill! First line: Oh call us hard names, call us mere tools | 1862 | XML
217.The southern cross. First line: In the name of God! Amen! | Blunt, Ellen Lloyd Key, 1821-1884. | 1861 | XML
218.Prayer to be said by all good citizens on the day of fasting and prayer : ordered by Abraham Lincoln. First line: In thy name, o Lord, we pray thee that thou will A prayer to be said by all good citizens on the day of fasting and prayer : ordered by Abraha | 1861 | XML
219.Tennesse! : fire away! Tennessee! fire away! | 1861 | XML
220.Land of the south! | 1861 | XML
221.Lines on the death of Major Gen. E. Van Dorn, C.S.A. First line: Bold and noble Earle VanDorn | 1861 | XML
222.Flag of secession. First line: Oh, say can't you see by the dawn's early light The Flag of secession. | Pinkney, Frank. | 1861 | XML
223.I am not sick, I'm over forty-five : I will make my wife stay at home and give the baby catnip tea. First line: I'm exempt, I'm exempt, I vow and desire | 1863 | XML
224.Attention / B. First line: Hearken, friends and foes now hearken | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
225.Despot's song! / "Ole Secesh."First line: With a beard that was filthy and red The despot's song! / "Ole Secesh." | Ticknor, Francis Orray, 1822-1874. | 1861 | XML
226.Cotton is king / N.G.R. First line: All hail to the great king | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
227.Prison bill of fare / by a prisoner of war ; composed, written and spoken at the exhibition of the "Prisoners of War Dramatic Association" Richmond, Va., Nov. 8, 1861. First line: Hail! modern writers, on the "Art of Eating" | 1861 | XML
228.Jeff. Davis in the White House. First line: Ye northern men in Washington | 1861 | XML
229.Bold engineer / O.H.S. First line: O bully George B. has come out of the west The bold engineer / O.H.S. | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
230.Appeal to the South. First line: Southerns! since we boast that name | 1862 | XML
231.Southern scene. First line: Oh! Mammy have you heard the news? A southern scene | 1861 | XML
232.Beauregard. First line: Flashing, flashing along the wires | 1861 | XML
233.The reasons why McClellan did not capture Richmond. First line: First he had two hills to pass | 1861 | XML
234.The guerillas : a southern war song. First line: Awake and to horse, my brother | Wallis, S. Teackle (Severn Teackle), 1816-1894. | 1861 | XML
235.Impromptu / Dr. Barnstable. First line: South, the South, the glorious South An impromptu / Dr. Barnstable | Barnstable, Dr. | 1861 | XML
236.The Maryland martyrs. First line: They bore them to a gloomy cell | 1861 | XML
237.My God! What is all this for?First line: Oh my God! what vengeful madness | 1861 | XML
238.The Southern men / By a Southern lady. First line: You can never win them back | Warfield, Catherine A. (Catherine Ann), 1816-1877. | 1861 | XML
239.The lass that loves a sailor. First line: Moon on the ocean was dimmed by a ripple | 1862 | XML
240.Are we free? / J. First line: Are we free? Go ask the question | Brewer, James R. | 1861 | XML
241.Hurrah for Jeff. Davis. First line: Our country now calls, we'll up and away | 1861 | XML
242.Confederate soldier's wife parting from her husband!First line: Here is thy trusty blade! The Confederate soldier's wife parting from her husband! | 1862 | XML
243.General Beauregard. First line: General G.T. Beauregard | 1861 | XML
244.The gallant mayor Brown. First line: Gather round all friends and neighbors | 1861 | XML
245.Current Serials Spreadsheet | Stambaugh, Emily | 1861 | XML
246.King Cotton / N. G. R. First line: All hail to the great king | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
247.Baltimore boys. First line: Standing on his country's cause The Baltimore boys. | 1861 | XML
248.Alls well : come to the rescue.At head of title: Song | 1862 | XML
249.Ode on the meeting of the Southern Congress / by H. Timrod. First line: Hath not the morning dawned with added light? | Timrod, Henry, 1828-1867. | 1862 | XML
250.Battle hymn of the Virginia soldier! First line: Father of earth and heaven! I call thy name! | 1861 | XML
251.Battle of Leesburgh! First line: Says Greely to Scott, to Richmond why not | 1862 | XML
252.God bless the South. First line: Now to heaven our prayer ascending | 1861 | XML
253.God be our trust. First line: God save our southern land, God be our trust! | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
254.Our opinion : a hit at these times / Le Diable Baiteux. First line: People endure all | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
255.Remember Ellsworth / B. First line: That noted burglar, Ellsworth | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1862 | XML
256.Southrons to arms! / Z. | 1862 | XML
257.Lines sacred to the memory of Capt. Henry C. Gorrell of Greensboro' N.C. : of the Second North Carolina Regiment, who fell in an attack which he led against the federal batteries at the battle of Fair Oaks, June 14, 1862 / by a friend of the cause. First | 1862 | XML
258.Southern national hymn. First line: God save our southern land, God be our trust! | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
259.There's life in the old land yet!First line: By blue Patapsco's billowy dash. | Randall, James Ryder, 1839-1908. | 1863 | XML
260.Beauregard at Shiloh. First line: Now glory to the Lord of hosts | 1861 | XML
261.To the democracy of the border states / M.H.W. | 1861 | XML
262.Confederate flag. First line: Bright banner of freedom, with pride I unfold thee The Confederate flag. | Elder, Susan Blanchard, 1835-1923. | 1861 | XML
263.King Cotton. First line: Old Cotton is King, boys, ha! ha! | 1861 | XML
264.The Southrons are coming. First line: Southrons are coming, heigho! heigho! | 1861 | XML
265.Bonnie blue flag. First line: We are a band of brothers, and natives of the soil The bonnie blue flag. | Macarthy, Harry, 1834-1888. | 1861 | XML
266.Prayer for the Southern cause | A prayer for the Southern cause | 1861 | XML
267.Disgrace & shame. First line: Hallo! what's the matter? | 1861 | XML
268.Hark! the summons / B. First line: Hark! in the South the thund'ring drum | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
269.Maryland in chains / by Mrs. D.K. Whitaker. First line: Oh vain is the splendor of blue-curtained skies | Whitaker, Mary Scrimzeour Furman, 1820-1906. | 1861 | XML
270.God help Kentucky! : an anthem. First line: Lord from thy heavenly throne | 1861 | XML
271.Freedom's call / Z. First line: Southrons to arms! | 1861 | XML
272.Our left : dedicated to the Maryland hero, Gen. Arnold Elzey, C.S.A. / "Ole Secesh. First line: From dawn to dark they stood | Ticknor, Francis Orray, 1822-1874. | 1861 | XML
273.Down-trodden Maryland. First line: Down-trodden, despised see brave Maryland lie | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
274.Southern Yankee Doodle. First line: Gallant Major Anderson! | 1861 | XML
275.The saucy little turtle. First line: Down on Mississippi river | 1861 | XML
276.North Carolina : a call to arms!!! First line: Ye sons of Carolina! awake from your dreaming! | 1861 | XML
277.Old Virginia never die. First line: Oh be easy, don't you teaze me | 1862 | XML
278.Down-trodden Maryland / B. First line: Down-trodden, despised see brave Maryland lie | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1862 | XML
279.Stonewall Jackson's Way. First line: Come, stack arms, men! Pile on the rails | Palmer, John Williamson, 1825-1906. | 1862 | XML
280.Little sogers. First line: What's the matter little sogers | 1861 | XML
281.Reply to the "volunteer Zouave." First line: We have seen the complaint of the red-legged Zou Zou | Harwood, Fannie A. | 1862 | XML
282.I am sick, don't draft me : "I have got a doctor's certificate." First line: Of the danger of exposure to a draft, we often read | 1861 | XML
283.The President's chair. First line: Ye Southrons arouse, and do battle, nor yield | 1861 | XML
284."Audax omnia perpeti Gens Lincolna ruit per vetitum nefas." / B. First line: Come pretty muse give me your help | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
285.Coast to Viryinia. | Toast to Virginia A Coast to Viryinia | 1863 | XML
286.Battle at Bulls Run. First line: Oh be easy, don't you teaze me | 1861 | XML
287.Running rhymes. First line: Old Abe, the northern president | 1861 | XML
288.Dodge's police. First line: Come all ye Southern lassies | 1861 | XML
289."Da Vis!" / by Quien Sabe? First line: Give us one chance, t'is all we ask | Ridgely, N. G. (Nicholas Greenberry), 1841-1882. | 1861 | XML
290.Herbert E. Valentine Civil War diary | Valentine, Herbert E. | 1861-1865 | XML